Adorable Photos of Animals With Their Babies That Will Make You Go ‘Aww’

Cheetah cub and her mother, Kenya. Female cheetahs give birth to around three cubs at a time. In the first few weeks, she moves the cubs from den to den, hiding them while she goes out hunting. Photo by: Marco Urso

Black skimmer bird and a baby chick. At hatching, the two mandibles of a young Black Skimmer are equal in length, but by fledging at four weeks, the lower mandible is already nearly 1 cm longer than the upper. Photo by: Michael Libbe

Mother lion carrying her cub. The lion cubs are then raised together, sometimes nursing communally. Photo by: Karsten Lehmkuhl

Musk ox mom and baby. The calf’s bond with its mother weakens after two years. Photo by: Randy Kokesch

Baby polar bear playing with his mother. Generally, she will nurse them for two and a half years. During that time she will protect them and teach them how to hunt. Photo by: Nik Zinoviev

Lambs playing on mother sheep. There are over 1 billion sheep in the world.. most of them are in China. Photo by: Roeselien Raimond

Baby rhino giving his mama a kiss. Female rhinos gestate their young for about 15-16 months and give birth to a calf every two to three years. Photo by: Phil Noble

Few hours old baby penguin. Penguins often huddle together to keep warm in the cold temperatures of Antarctica. Photo by: Ondrej Zaruba

Baby antelope playing with stick. Baby antelope is an easy target and mother keeps it on the secret location until it becomes stronger. Photo by: Oliver Berg

Baby hippo with mom. Newly born hippos are relatively small, weighing from 55 to 120 pounds, and are protected by their mothers, not only from crocodiles and lions but from male hippos. Photo by: unknown

Walrus and his baby. Walrus mothers are extremely nurturing, constantly hugging and nuzzling their babies. They often keep their young on ice floes to avoid the crush of the jostling walrus crowds on land. Photo by: Mauro Mozzarelli

Mother gorilla hugs baby. They live in small groups (or bands) of 6-7 individuals, including one silverback (adult male), a few females, and their young. Photo by: Fredrik Von Erichsen